Web Site Closed

This web site is now closed. Any content within the site should be deemed out of date. The site remains for historical purposes only in order that the achievements of this responder scheme has a lasting legacy.

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May 1, 2010 at 8:00 pm Leave a comment

Nina joins the team

Nina Lintott is our newest team member. She lives on the Heatherside estate and here is a recent article published about her in the Heatherside Newsletter.

newsl09

April 15, 2009 at 11:38 am Leave a comment

Peter gets fit for charity

secamblogoPeter Glover, Responder Operations Manager for Surrey, and also a well respected Responder in our community, will be running (well maybe jogging and walking!) for charity shortly, all in the name of a great cause – Frimley Park Hospital Childrens Ward.

Here is the story in his own words:

“I am sure when people mention my name, the words athletic, sportsman, fit, agile and slim like, would not spring to mind and yet I am 4 days away from participating in a 10K Charity Run to raise money for Frimley Park Hospital Children’s Ward.

This has been made even more poignant for myself with some unforeseen events.

Cameron (my eldest son) is six and attends a local mainstream school. His best friend is a little boy called Jack who is in his class –  at times they are inseparable they both like Star Wars, they both have red hair and freckles and share many other likes and dislikes.

Unfortunately without going into too much detail Jack is far from a healthy, normal child and every day has a degree of uncertainty – will he make it to school? will he make it through the day? how will he be when he gets home?.  On several occasions this term Jack has collapsed at school and had to be rushed to Frimley Park where he has open access to the Children’s Ward. He is then usually transferred to Great Ormond Street.

This 10K run has been on the cards for some time. It’s my way of getting motivated and get myself fit. I am no different to anyone else and need a motivation and out of the mouth of Cameron I am going to run for Jack. As an added incentive Cameron thinks his daddy can do it if he raises £250. You try explaining to a six year old that I have four days not only to get myself finally ready but to raise £250.

Cameron’s response ‘you have friends like Jack haven’t you dad?’ And he is right. And that is why I was wondering if you be able to spare £2/3 (cash) or written to Frimley Park Hospital if it is a cheque.

 I am going to try to post a daily bulletin on my facebook, so if you want to know how it’s going check it out at http://www.facebook.com/home.php?#/profile.php?id=637482121

One worrying point, this is it Ann commented on the course route. She said ‘Look it starts outside A&E and finishes at the mortuary!’ Let’s hope she is joking” Warm Regards Peter Glover.

If you would like to sponser Peter, or you know of a business sponser, please send any donations to:

Peter Glover Fun Run c/o – 2 Heron Close, Mytchett, GU16 6JH.

We all wish Peter well in his quest for charity and of course will be supporting him all the way.

April 2, 2009 at 11:02 am Leave a comment

The Scheme Evolves

Just as the Deepcut Scheme developed into Surrey Heath Responders several months ago, so the time has come to evolve and diversify further.

As one of the most established and experienced teams in Surrey, the Surrey Heath First Responders have been training and mentoring surrounding groups with a long-term view of helping them to establish new schemes and become self-sufficient.

The first of these schemes went live in February and six of ‘our’ responders will transfer to the scheme, known as Rushmoor Responders, under the leadership of our former deputy Steve Dowley.

If you look at the map at https://cfrsurreyheath.wordpress.com/2009/01/19/responder-coverage-continues-to-expand-into-2009/ essentially the A331 will act as the divider, with those responders to the West moving into the Rushmoor Scheme.

new_scheme_assignments1

In conjuction with this move, we have a new SECAmb interface in the form of our very own Peter Glover who is currently seconded as Responder Operations Manager for Surrey, which means we now have a local SECAmb officer available to support us.

We wish the Rushmoor Responders the best of luck in their new venture and will continue to collaborate closely as our colleagues progress. You can keep tabs on them also at http://www.rushmoor-responders.com

March 14, 2009 at 9:33 pm Leave a comment

Community Responders rise to the challenge

Picturesque Deepcut

Over the past few days your Community Responders have been out in adverse weather conditions supporting the South East Coast Ambulance Service at incidents throughout several Surrey & Hampshire borough’s.

Six on-duty responders have been to a variety of winter calls, from a sledge crashed  into a tree, to somebody overheating and several falls in icy conditions.

All in a day’s work for these dedicated volunteers.

February 6, 2009 at 11:57 pm Leave a comment

AMBULANCE SERVICE SAY THANKS FOR SUPPORT

secamblogo2South East Coast Ambulance Service NHS Trust (SECAmb) would like to thank its staff, the public and voluntary organisations for their support during the recent extreme weather.

Severe weather and road conditions across the South East region have made this week particularly challenging for the Trust.

However, the dedication of SECAmb staff, St John Ambulance, the Red Cross and other local voluntary organisations such as 4×4 clubs, along with assistance from helpful members of the public, have meant the Trust has been able to deliver a safe and as swift a service as possible in challenging circumstances.

SECAmb staff have worked around the clock, and often above and beyond the call of duty, during the extreme weather to ensure that patients received our help as quickly as possible. Many have offered to work additional shifts and have braved snow and ice to ensure they were available to respond to the needs of patients.

Some staff have stayed overnight close to where they work in order to keep driving distances to a minimum and the Trust’s teams of voluntary Community Responders have continued to provide vital additional support across the Trust’s Sussex, Surrey and Kent region. SECAmb would also like to thank its fellow emergency service partners for the additional support they have provided.

Examples of dedication include:

* Two members of the public in Caterham, Surrey, used their 4×4 vehicle to help a SECAmb crew reach a patient. They also spent more than four hours towing people’s cars out of thick snow.

* ‘South East 4×4 Response’ volunteers ferried emergency control room staff to and from one of SECAmb’s Emergency Dispatch Centres in Banstead, Surrey so they were available to answer 999 calls.

* A West Sussex paramedic was snowed in at Hassocks but commandeered his son’s sledge to carry his emergency response bag and was available to provide a first response to any 999 calls in his immediate area.

* There were a number of examples of members of the public  helping to free staff members personal vehicles from the snow  so they could get to work

* A number of staff walked through the snow to start their shifts. One Paramedic walked more than six miles.

* Staff car-shared where driving to work was an option in order to keep journeys to a minimum.

* Many staff with homes close to their place of work offered colleagues a bed for the night and a meal between shifts.

With the possibility of further cold weather during the next week – and with 999 calls to  Emergency Dispatch Centres in Surrey, Sussex and Kent already markedly higher than during the same  period last year – SECAmb has plans in place should the weather worsen again. It will continue to closely monitor the situation and is asking for the public’s continued support by reminding them that they should only call 999 in an emergency.

SECAmb’s Director of Operations Sue Harris said: “The severe weather placed huge pressure on our staff and resources and meant we took longer than usual to respond to some 999 calls.

“We put a number of measures in place to deal with the challenging situation, including securing additional 4 x 4 vehicles from voluntary agencies such as St John Ambulance and local 4×4 clubs.

“We would like to thank every voluntary agency and any member of the public which provided assistance.We are extremely grateful for their support and dedication throughout this difficult time. We’d also like to say a big thank you to all of our staff who did a tremendous job under very difficult circumstances.

“The public can continue to help us by only calling 999 in the event of an emergency – we don’t want to dissuade anyone from calling for our help if they genuinely need it but, if someone’s call is less urgent we would ask people to consider whether they could get support and advice from other NHS providers such as calling NHS Direct or visiting a local NHS walk in centre.”

SECAmb has issued the following advice on when to dial 999 for an ambulance:

If you think a patient is suffering from one of the following you must dial 999 for an ambulance:

* heart attack (e.g. chest pain for more than 15 minutes)
* sudden unexplained shortness of breath
* heavy bleeding
* unconsciousness (even if the patient has regained consciousness)
* traumatic back/spinal/neck pain

You should also call for an ambulance if:

* you think the patient’s illness or injury is life-threatening
* you think the illness or injury may become worse, or even life-threatening on the way to the hospital
* moving the patient/s without skilled people could cause further injury
* the patient needs the skills or equipment of the ambulance service and its personnel
* traffic conditions could cause a delay in getting the person to hospital and time could be critical

February 5, 2009 at 12:57 pm Leave a comment

SECAmb Press Release – Severe Weather Warning

Severe weather conditions affect SECAmb secamblogo2

Press release – 2 February 2009

As severe weather conditions continue to affect the South East region, the public is being urged to support South East Coast Ambulance Service NHS Trust (SECAmb) by only calling 999 in the event of an emergency.

Staff at SECAmb are working hard to continue to deliver a safe and as swift a service as possible across Kent, Surrey and Sussex, however, heavy snow and poor driving conditions mean that ambulances are taking longer than usual to respond to some calls.

SECAmb has put a number of measures in place to deal with the challenging situation, including securing additional 4 x 4 vehicles from voluntary agencies such as St John Ambulance, and some frontline crews and emergency dispatch centre staff who were on night shift last night stayed at work this morning to cover for colleagues who were having difficulty getting in to work this morning.

“We are responding to all 999 calls that we receive, but the current situation is obviously placing additional pressure on our staff and resources, particularly across the Surrey area.” said Sue Harris, SECAmb’s Director of Operations.

“We would like to reassure the public that everything possible is being done to ensure that we respond to 999 calls as quickly as we can and provide a good service for our patients. However, current weather conditions mean that we are taking longer than usual to respond to some 999 calls.

“The public can help us during this challenging time by only calling 999 in the event of an emergency – we don’t want to dissuade anyone from calling for our help if they genuinely need it but, if someone’s call is less urgent we would ask people to consider whether they could get support and advice from other NHS providers such as calling NHS Direct or visiting a local NHS walk in centre.”

SECAmb has issued the following advice on when to dial 999 for an ambulance:

If you think a patient is suffering from one of the following you must dial 999 for an ambulance:

* heart attack (e.g. chest pain for more than 15 minutes)
* sudden unexplained shortness of breath
* heavy bleeding
* unconsciousness (even if the patient has regained consciousness)
* traumatic back/spinal/neck pain

You should also call for an ambulance if:

* you think the patient’s illness or injury is life-threatening
* you think the illness or injury may become worse, or even life-threatening on the way to the hospital
* moving the patient/s without skilled people could cause further injury
* the patient needs the skills or equipment of the ambulance service and its personnel
* traffic conditions could cause a delay in getting the person to hospital and time could be critical

February 2, 2009 at 8:23 pm Leave a comment

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